12 C
Sydney
Sunday, October 17, 2021

Mid-year surge in white collar jobs, Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals

Must read

- Sponsored Ad -

Australia’s post-mining boom shift to knowledge-based service work has gathered pace after a mid-year surge in skilled white-collar jobs.

In the three months to August, nearly 76,000 jobs were added in professional, scientific and technical services, Bureau of Statistics figures show.

- Advertisement -

Jobs growth was also strong in administrative services, education and training and information media and telecommunications.

But traditional blue-collar workers did not fare so well – employment shrank in mining, manufacturing, construction and agriculture in the three months to the end of August.

- Advertisement -

Jobs growth was also strong in administrative services, education and training and information media and telecommunications.

But traditional blue-collar workers did not fare so well – employment shrank in mining, manufacturing, construction and agriculture in the three months to the end of August.

- Advertisement -

In contrast, non-routine jobs have become steadily more important.

“These jobs tend to be more difficult to automate for a number of reasons,” Ms Heath said. “For example, some non-routine occupations, such as architecture, may require creativity and the ability to solve non-routine problems, while others, such as child care work, intrinsically require a physical human presence.”

A recent NSW government report predicted the proportion of knowledge-intensive jobs in the economy would rise from 48 per cent to 61 per cent by 2036.

Ms Heath said the healthcare and social assistance industry has made the largest contribution to employment growth over the past 15 years and most of this has been in “non-routine work”. After health care, the two industries that have made the largest contributions to growth in non-routine jobs over that period are professional, scientific and technical services and education and training.

In contrast, non-routine jobs have become steadily more important.

“These jobs tend to be more difficult to automate for a number of reasons,” Ms Heath said. “For example, some non-routine occupations, such as architecture, may require creativity and the ability to solve non-routine problems, while others, such as child care work, intrinsically require a physical human presence.”

A recent NSW government report predicted the proportion of knowledge-intensive jobs in the economy would rise from 48 per cent to 61 per cent by 2036.

Ms Heath said the healthcare and social assistance industry has made the largest contribution to employment growth over the past 15 years and most of this has been in “non-routine work”. After health care, the two industries that have made the largest contributions to growth in non-routine jobs over that period are professional, scientific and technical services and education and training.

Online Source

The Indian Telegraph Sydney Australia

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

More articles

- Advertisement -

Latest article