28.1 C
Australia
Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Australia to return historic Indian Artefacts

Must read

Mustafa Yuksel pleads responsible to Metropolis of Ink capturing

A person accused of capturing up a tattoo parlour co-owned by a bikie and an ex-AFL star has pleaded responsible to 4 prices....

Coronavirus Victoria: 6 new circumstances, no deaths, 14-day common falls

Victoria has recorded six new coronavirus circumstances and no deaths, as town’s all essential 14-day common fell once more.Regional Victoria’s 14-day common has...

The Australian Government will return three culturally significant artefacts during the Prime Minister’s visit to India in January 2020.

The artefacts, which were held by the National Gallery of Australia (Gallery), were purchased in good faith, but extensive research undertaken by the Gallery has led to its decision to voluntarily return these artefacts to India.

The artefacts being returned are:

  • Pair of door guardians (dvarapala) 15th Century, Tamil Nadu, India – (two works); and
  • The serpent king (Nagaraja) 6th to 8th Century, Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh, India.

“Like India, we understand the value of our ancient cultures and artefacts,” the Prime Minister said.

“The return of these artefacts is the right thing to do. This is another demonstration of deep relationship between Australia and India.”

Both India and Australia are party to the UNESCO 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transport of Ownership of Cultural Property.

“The strong ties Australian and Indian institutions have made in recent years have helped develop important professional relationships and share culture. The return of these artefacts also underscores the world’s debt to India’s magnificent culture, history and legacy,” the Minister for Foreign Affairs Marise Payne said. 

“Historic artefacts play a significant role in modern society by allowing communities to acknowledge and celebrate their shared history and culture. The National Gallery of Australia recognises this, and is strongly committed to the ethical collecting of cultural material and best practice collection management. I commend the Gallery for resolving these legacy issues,” the Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts Paul Fletcher MP said.

Criminal law proceedings are currently underway in India and the United States against former New York art dealer Mr. Subhash Kapoor, from whom these artefacts were purchased. The Australian Government does not have any role in these proceedings.

Latest article

ASX falls after no clear signal of Cup Day price minimize

The Australian sharemarket misplaced floor after the Reserve Financial institution of Australia gave no clear signal of a Melbourne Cup Day rate of...

South Sydney and North Queensland ahead Ethan Lowe compelled to retire after struggling a neck damage

South Sydney and premiership-winning North Queensland ahead Ethan Lowe has been compelled to retire after struggling a neck damage earlier this season. Lowe...

Jackson Williams: Stunning CCTV footage captures footy participant’s nurse assault

An AFL district participant grabbed a nurse as she was strolling to work within the early morning, dragged her into an alleyway, pinned...

Household speaks after mother-of-five’s mysterious loss of life on Gold Coast freeway

The household of a mother-of-five discovered lifeless on the aspect of a busy Gold Coast freeway say the lady had “turned her life...

Hotelier Julian Gerner’s coronavirus problem rushed to Excessive Courtroom listening to

A Victorian hotelier’s bid to problem to the state’s coronavirus lockdown coverage has been rushed to the nation’s highest court docket. Mornington Peninsula...